Assassin’s Apprentice (The Farseer Trilogy, Book 1)

Young Fitz is the bastard son of the noble Prince Chivalry, raised in the shadow of the royal court by his father’s gruff stableman. He is treated as an outcast by all the royalty except the devious King Shrewd, who has him secretly tutored in the arts of the assassin. For in Fitz’s blood runs the magic Skill—and the darker knowledge of a child raised with the stable hounds and rejected by his family.
 
As barbarous raiders ravage the coasts, Fitz is growing to manhood. Soon he will face his first dangerous, soul-shattering mission. And though some regard him as a threat to the throne, he may just be the key to the survival of the kingdom.
 
Praise for Robin Hobb and Assassin’s Apprentice
 
“Fantasy as it ought to be written . . . Robin Hobb’s books are diamonds in a sea of zircons.”—George R. R. Martin
 
“A gleaming debut in the crowded field of epic fantasies . . . a delightful take on the powers and politics behind the throne.”—Publishers Weekly
 
“This is the kind of book you fall into, and start reading slower as you get to the end, because you don’t want it to be over.”—Steven Brust

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

Write Publish Promote at Cowgirlheart Media
Write, Publish, Promote. Words I am learning to live by. Want this to be your motto too? Join me and together we'll navigate the path to publishing success.

Latest posts by Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor (see all)

About Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor 2429 Articles

Write, Publish, Promote. Words I am learning to live by. Want this to be your motto too? Join me and together we’ll navigate the path to publishing success.

3 Comments

  1. A tale of duty, sacrifice and injustice I am writing this review because I found this trilogy impossible to put down but emotionally draining. This was the kind of story that grabs your guts as well as your mind. If you have read Haldeman’s “All My Sins Remembered”, you know what I mean. After I finished the last Assassin book I spent hours trying to sort out my feelings. It hit me that hard. 

  2. Compelling and sensitive, but not for everyone An avid reader of fantasy, I was delighted to discover Robin Hobb’s Farseer trilogy. Hobbs is no Tolkein or Martin but she has created a world that is compelling as well as convincing. Her remarkable sensitivity towards her characters and the issues they face caused some people to abandon the novels, complaining that they were too slow or whiny, but other readers found her voice unique and soothing. 

  3. Quality reading, quality entertainment Ever since I read George Martin’s “Song of Ice and Fire” series (at least, what was available at the time), I was looking for some kind of “middle ground” between fun and enjoyable, light fantasy the likes of Salvatore or early Goodkind and the heavy, ambitious, but nevertheless sometimes overwhelming saga created by Martin. In Hobb’s literature, I believe I’ve found that middle ground. 

Leave a Reply