Titans

Rob Dunbar is the world’s best history professor. And with good reason: he’s been alive for three thousand years, keeping his existence a secret since before the days of Athens. But a stranger named Baxter has a better use for Rob’s vast expertise. Baxter’s looking to found a mining company in the Asteroid Belt. In exchange for Rob’s help, he’ll try to unravel the mystery of Rob’s origin. As they’re getting their outfit off the ground, they come under covert attack by HemiCo, a powerful Mars-based corporation. And Rob learns Baxter has a secret of his own—he’s not human. He’s a highly illegal AI. Developed by HemiCo in the wilds of Mars, the first AI escaped decades ago. They’ve been fighting a shadow war against their creators ever since. Dragged to Mars, Rob is thrown into the center of the fight—and becomes the unlikely leader of a revolution that will change the course of human history amongst the stars.

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

Write Publish Promote at Cowgirlheart Media
Write, Publish, Promote. Words I am learning to live by. Want this to be your motto too? Join me and together we'll navigate the path to publishing success.

Latest posts by Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor (see all)

About Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor 2429 Articles

Write, Publish, Promote. Words I am learning to live by. Want this to be your motto too? Join me and together we’ll navigate the path to publishing success.

3 Comments

  1. Shaky start but worth the read Titans is an interesting book that starts off trying to be more of a mystery novel than it really is. We are first introduced to our characters and are given hints of mysterious backgrounds. We then move onto various plots against nameless and powerful shadowy entities that are never fully explored. 

  2. An educated author, a clever story History, philosophy, human angst and an original plot blend seamlessly in a well-edited story that has several layers. The writer’s education and reading shines through with many witty references to others’ works, including Plato’s wine-dark sea, yet it is not just a book for the erudite. His dry humor is subtle, his story is engaging, and his concept is thought-provoking. I absolutely loved it.

  3. Not your average space opera Superb. The author calls it a “space opera”, but the author is too humble. Characterization, dialogue, plot are all well executed in a highly original fashion. The main charcter may remind some veteran SF fans of Heinlein’s “Lazarus Jones” character. This author’s skills are such that I didn’t make that connection until I began to write this review.

Leave a Reply