The Three-Body Problem

The Three-Body Problem is the first chance for English-speaking readers to experience this multiple award winning phenomenon from China’s most beloved science fiction author, Liu Cixin.

Set against the backdrop of China’s Cultural Revolution, a secret military project sends signals into space to establish contact with aliens. An alien civilization on the brink of destruction captures the signal and plans to invade Earth. Meanwhile, on Earth, different camps start forming, planning to either welcome the superior beings and help them take over a world seen as corrupt, or to fight against the invasion. The result is a science fiction masterpiece of enormous scope and vision.

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

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Write, Publish, Promote. Words I am learning to live by. Want this to be your motto too? Join me and together we'll navigate the path to publishing success.

3 Comments

  1. Opening salvo top notch Science Fiction series First, this does not read like a translation. Ken Liu’s translation of Cixin Liu’s original Chinese language novel, “San ti” (2008) comes across seamlessly in the spare, translated English prose (though I cannot speak as to the authenticity of the translation, rather, just the style). Ken Liu sprinkles footnotes throughout the novel giving some useful background with regards to the Chinese Cultural Revolution of the 1960’s and 1970’s, as well as background in math and physics. 

  2. Science Fiction that Relies Heavily on Physics Ye Wenjie, a young astrophysicist, suffered during the Chinese Cultural Revolution seeing her physicist father killed by an out of control group of young students. For awhile she buries herself in the forests as part of the Construction Corps, sawing down irreplaceable old trees. This experience like the Cultural Revolution convinces Ye Wenjie that humanity is not redeemable. 

  3. Completely spectacular and engaging As a longtime fan of science fiction, from pulpy schlock to the deep, literary works, I was quite curious to read this Chinese book that has become a bestseller, and see how it might differ. It doesn’t, really, though it is completely and totally Chinese, from well footnoted history to the language used. I particularly appreciated the translator’s hard work to maintain the Chinese spirit of the book while creating something understandable for Americans. 

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