The Stories of Ray Bradbury (Everyman’s Library (Cloth))

One hundred of Ray Bradbury’s remarkable stories which have, together with his classic novels, earned him an immense international audience and his place among the most imaginative and enduring writers of our time.

Here are the Martian stories, tales that vividly animate the red planet, with its brittle cities and double-mooned sky. Here are the stories that speak of a special nostalgia for Green Town, Illinois, the perfect setting for a seemingly cloudless childhood—except for the unknown terror lurking in the ravine. Here are the Irish stories and the Mexican stories, linked across their separate geographies by Bradbury’s astonishing inventiveness. Here, too, are thrilling, terrifying stories—including “The Veldt” and “The Fog Horn”—perfect for reading under the covers.

Read for the first time, these stories become as unshakable as one’s own fantasies. Read again—and again—they reveal new, dazzling facets of the extraordinary art of Ray Bradbury.The Stories of Ray Bradbury–a hundred of his best stories, selected by the author himself–is the definitive collection of one of the greatest fantasists the world has ever known. Published in 1980, the volume contains stories selected from the first four decades of Bradbury’s career. There are his unique stories of Mars, which later landed in The Martian Chronicles. There are nostalgic stories of Green Town, Illinois, which Bradbury later brewed into Dandelion Wine. The treasures here also include his regional tales of Ireland and of rural Mexico, classic science fiction such as “The Fog Horn,” and the rarely reprinted novella “Frost and Fire.” Among the half dozen previously uncollected stories are a few of his earliest–and most terrifying. These include the unforgettable “October Game” (which the author regards as perhaps his most shocking story amongst the thousand that he’s written), and “Black Ferris,” later to be transformed into the classic Something Wicked This Way Comes. Bradbury also contributes a revealing and highly informative look back at his own career. If you can possess only one book by the legendary Ray Bradbury, this is it. –Stanley Wiater

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

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3 Comments

  1. Why not go for a double. What can I say about this collection, except that is essential reading for anyone serious about Science Fiction or Fantasy as a form of literature (that’s right I said it-the dreaded “l” word) Bradbury has piled up enough superlatives in his life that I don’t think I need to go into them. 

  2. Definitive Collection I pay particular attention to Ray Bradbury as an author, having read him since I was a pre-teenager. Now I’m a philosophy student in college, and despite having become much, much more ‘sophisticated’ in my literary tastes, I still enjoy Bradbury. I suppose you could think of me as a collector of sorts, and through the years, I have not found a better collection of his work. Bradbury is famed in the general public for “Farenheit 451,” or perhaps his “Something Wicked This…

  3. Ever had a love affair with a book? I have. I bought a first edition in the US in 1980. It is both my favourite book and most travelled – being an essential component of my personal baggage on numerous international business trips. For someone who grew up in the golden years of science fiction and as a lover of the short story literary form, for me there is only one writer that constantly delivers fresh insights into the possible worlds around us. That writer is Ray Bradbury. He brilliantly spins a lyrical web of simple, singular ideas…

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