The Edible Woman

Ever since her engagement, the strangest thing has been happening to Marian McAlpin: she can’t eat.  First meat.  Then eggs, vegetables, cake, pumpkin seeds–everything!  Worse yet, she has the crazy feeling that she’s being eaten.  Marian ought to feel consumed with passion, but she really just feels…consumed.  A brilliant and powerful work rich in irony and metaphor, The Edible Woman is an unforgettable masterpiece by a true master of contemporary literary fiction.

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

Write Publish Promote at Cowgirlheart Media
Write, Publish, Promote. Words I am learning to live by. Want this to be your motto too? Join me and together we'll navigate the path to publishing success.

Latest posts by Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor (see all)

About Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor 2429 Articles
Write, Publish, Promote. Words I am learning to live by. Want this to be your motto too? Join me and together we'll navigate the path to publishing success.

3 Comments

  1. A tasty treat! I will have to admit that curiosity is the prime reason for reading this book. The back cover blurb doesn’t give much by way of details of the actual storyline, just that the main character feels like she is being eaten. I couldn’t stop myself from reading this book after reading that! However, the story wasn’t exactly what I was expecting, although it was still pretty good. 

  2. The Edible Woman was delicious! The best feature of this book is its ability to enthrall. Clearly, Margaret Atwood’s style in this novel is still green, as she wrote this book when she was only about 24, but I think that it contributed to my enjoyment of this book. While it is slightly reminiscent of some of her later fiction, it differs significantly in the narrational flow, allowing the reader to be gently assimilated into the message of the book without feeling as if he or she should always be “on the…

  3. Fun with the world of metaphor I’ve got a few Atwood books and this is by far the oldest one, so if it’s not her writing debut (as opposed to poetry, which I think she did as well) it’s pretty close and I have to say that I was pretty impressed with how strong her narrative voice was and how confident the book feels. Reading it you get a sense that the author knows exactly what she’s doing and how to go about it. That sense makes the book that much more fun to read, even if it’s not going to be recognized as one of her…

Leave a Reply