The Day the Crayons Quit

Crayons have feelings, too, in this funny back-to-school story illustrated by the creator of Stuck and This Moose Belongs to Me–now a #1 New York Times bestseller!
Poor Duncan just wants to color. But when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters, all saying the same thing: His crayons have had enough! They quit! Beige Crayon is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown Crayon. Black wants to be used for more than just outlining. Blue needs a break from coloring all those bodies of water. And Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking—each believes he is the true color of the sun.

What can Duncan possibly do to appease all of the crayons and get them back to doing what they do best?
 

Kids will be imagining their own humorous conversations with crayons and coloring a blue streak after sharing laughs with Drew Daywalt and New York Times bestseller Oliver Jeffers. This story is perfect as a back-to-school gift, for all budding artists, for fans of humorous books such as Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems and The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Sciezka and Lane Smith, and for fans of Oliver Jeffers’ Stuck, The Incredible Book Eating Boy, Lost and Found, and This Moose Belongs to Me.

Amazon Best Children’s Book of 2013: The Day the Crayons Quit, Drew Daywalt’s clever story of a box of crayons gone rogue will get the whole family laughing at the letters written by the occupants of the ubiquitous yellow and green box. The combination of text and Oliver Jeffers’ illustrations match the colors’ personalities beautifully as the crayons share their concern, appreciation, or downright frustration: yellow and orange demand to know the true color of the sun, while green–clearly the people pleaser of the bunch–is happy with his workload of crocodiles, trees, and dinosaurs. Peach crayon wants to know why his wrapper was torn off, leaving him naked and in hiding; blue is exhausted and, well, worn out; and pink wants a little more paper time. The result of this letter writing campaign is colorful creativity and after reading this book I will never look at crayons the same way again–nor would I want to. —Seira Wilson

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

Write Publish Promote at Cowgirlheart Media
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3 Comments

  1. Fantastic Read for Kids! I read this book to my 5-year-old daughter and when we got to the end she asked me to read it again. When I got to the end of the second reading she announced she had an idea about drawing “live crayons like in the book” and embarked on a project of drawing different color crayons with colored wardrobes to match and made a “dress the crayons” game out of it. She loves to have books read to her, but this is one of the only times my short-attention-span kid has asked for the same book twice in…

  2. Fantastic book for all ages! I am not ashamed to admit it, I’m 41 yrs old and just purchased this book…for myself! I work at a library and when this book came in every person who read/looked at this book said they were going to purchase this book for either a child, or children in the family, or for themselves! I can’t say enough good things about this book, do yourself a favor buy it! You’ll smile and laugh and love it each time you read it!

  3. “HILARIOUS, FUN-FILLED, AND ENTERTAINING!” Award-winning writer/director of film and TV Drew Daywalt, and New York Times bestseller Oliver Jeffers, deliver an entertaining children’s story that is playful, and packed with fun. This delightful story will have children laughing, reading, and sharing their own thoughts, while giving crayons a whole new meaning. The colorful, stunning illustrations come to life as each colorful crayon gives their complaint, while protesting about their color. Orange and Yellow are not speaking to each other…

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