Terms of Enlistment (Frontlines)

The year is 2108, and the North American Commonwealth is bursting at the seams. For welfare rats like Andrew Grayson, there are only two ways out of the crime-ridden and filthy welfare tenements, where you’re restricted to two thousand calories of badly flavored soy every day:

You can hope to win the lottery and draw a ticket on a colony ship settling off-world, or you can join the service.

With the colony lottery a pipe dream, Andrew chooses to enlist in the armed forces for a shot at real food, a retirement bonus, and maybe a ticket off Earth. But as he starts a career of supposed privilege, he soon learns that the good food and decent health care come at a steep price…and that the settled galaxy holds far greater dangers than military bureaucrats or the gangs that rule the slums.

The debut novel from Marko Kloos, Terms of Enlistment is a new addition to the great military sci-fi tradition of Robert Heinlein, Joe Haldeman, and John Scalzi.

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

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3 Comments

  1. Echos of Heinlein and Huxley This book is extremely readable and engaging. I finished it quickly and felt disappointed that it ended and I am hoping for this to grow into a series. The book is a classic “Hero’s Journey” storyline, and I enjoyed it as much as I enjoyed “Starship Troopers” and noted a lot of the differences. Instead of Heinlein’s “Citizen/Civilian” political dynamic that led to an almost “utopia” found in the classic “Starship Troopers” we find the results of generational welfare taken to the logical…

  2. Out the “self-publish” league Fine SF novel. Money well spent. Good entertainment, engrossing and real. Better than second-tier work from folks like Silverberg or whoever. Solid, visual, no-fat writing. Great technical skill at describing action, and he makes the most of his strengths. Strictly mature professional, no self-indulgence or slack, no major false moves, quite a trick for a guy with no editor. I didn’t notice the prose at all, which is the highest praise there is for guys whose names don’t end in Vance or…

  3. Outstanding first novel! Marko Kloos has written an outstanding first novel. He paints a convincing world view, drawing the reader into his creation and making us feel part of the narrative. He intersperses action with interesting perspectives on how society and the human race may evolve, and gives a gritty realism to his vision of the future. His own military service is evident in his descriptions of service life, training, etc. 

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