Technical Editing (5th Edition) (The Allyn & Bacon Seriesin Technical Communication)

This market-leading text, which reflects recent changes in technology, workplace practices and the global marketplace, progresses from concepts and basic copyediting to comprehensive editing, management and production issues.  The addition of Angela Eaton of Texas Tech University brings a fresh tone to her updates of content and pedagogy while retaining the authoritative voice of Carolyn Rude.  Some of the text’s changes include an update ot Chapter 6, “Electronic Editing,” and examples about editing Web sites are found throughout the text  to support the increased role of online resources in every aspect of communication.

 

 

 

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

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3 Comments

  1. Excellent for all fields, editors and writers Dr. Rude did a masterful job of explaining the concepts behind good writing. Reading this book improves your entire writing process by teaching the reader what he should not do when constructing any component within a document, be it a sentence, paragraph, chapter, etc. 

  2. A solid reference or textbook Carolyn Rude’s Technical Editing (fourth edition) is a solid, comprehensive volume equally suitable as a textbook or a desktop reference. It attempts to support the writer or editor of technical prose in the collaborative process of shaping rough text into a polished and accurate final product. Its scope is ambitious, ranging from exercises in proofreading hard copy using standard markup symbols to explorations of the legal and ethical ramifications of technical prose. 

  3. Guidelines, not Rudes (Rules) Dr. Rude was one of my technical writing professors. I recall using an early edition of this book when I was taking her class, identifying and suggesting edits as part of the class work…an instructive process. I have always found her guidelines to be clear and user-friendly. I do not agree with one reviewer’s example of “handicap”, as Dr. Rude was using that as an example within the admonition for caution, a sophisticated concept that was perhaps lost on the reviewer at the time…

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