Chinese Fairy Tales and Fantasies (The Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library)

This fresh and elegant translation of one hundred tales from twenty-five centuries of Chinese literature opens up a magical world far from our customary haunts. Illustrated with woodcuts.

With black-and-white drawings throughout
Part of the Pantheon Fairy Tale and Folklore Library

Nanci Arvizu, Writing and Reviews Editor

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3 Comments

  1. A collection worthy of the Grimm Brothers This is a wonderful collection of simple wonder stories and fables from China, most of very ancient origin. There are even some from the Taoist master Chuang Tzu. They are all very brief, in typical Chinese fashion, very direct to the point, and therefore very leisurely reading. Very reminiscent of the Grimm Brothers, Charles Perault and even Aesop, they also give us a rare and fascinating look at Taoist folklore, for most of these stories come for Taoist tellers speaking out against the…

  2. unique and special I just had to come in here and pen this to counterbalance the so-and-so who assigned this opus but a single star. The stories are often short, but that should not detract from them, nor should the simplicity of some. They are, after all, CHINESE. The culture is different; the values are different; the symbology is different. I found the collection delightfully refreshing, and I particularly found some of the pieces extremely funny. This book is a definite keeper that the reader will remember…

  3. PG-13 I just got this book and I’m writing on my experience last night, when I began reading a story to my daughter. In the course of three pages, a woman was cut up “inch by inch starting at the feet”; a man’s head was cut off; in hell he was tortured with “molten bronze, the iron rod, pounding, grinding, the fire pit, the boiling cauldron, the hill of knives, the forest of swords”; as further punishment he was reborn as female; as a child, she fell into a fire and could get “no relief from the…

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